Romero, the Corpse flower is about to bloom at the Phipps Conservatory (Pittsburgh, PA) and when it does, it will emit the smell of a rotting flesh.


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When it blooms, the flower also opens up to attract bugs to pollinate it but the fact that it opens up dos not make this plant carnivorous.

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In 2013 when the Romero plant bloomed, it attracted about 12,000 visitors to Phipps Conservatory.

Visitors crowd around a Titan arum, also known as the "corpse flower" in expectation of getting a whiff of it's characteristic blooming smell of rotting flesh, Monday, July 22, 2013, at the U.S. Botanic Garden in Washington. The smell had peaked in the very early morning hours, yet despite the lack of stink visitors streamed in to get a look at the unusual plant. (AP Photo/Jacquelyn Martin)

Visitors crowd around a Titan arum, also known as the “corpse flower” in expectation of getting a whiff of it’s characteristic blooming smell of rotting flesh in 2013 (AP Photo/Jacquelyn Martin)

This year, Romero has a cousin at the Phipps which has been named “Barbara”.  Barbara is not about to bloom because it is in another stage of life but it will be storing it’s energy for bloom time.

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